Herald Times: Autism Supports Program at Indiana University Would Be Worthwhile

In her Herald Times column, former CIP alumna Adria writes about the benefits of offering programming supports for college students with autism and learning differences.

A few weeks ago, I published a column on college support programs for students with autism spectrum disorders. The fact that the disorder now affects 1 in every 59 children has prompted more postsecondary institutions to recognize the need for programming that supports the unique needs of these students.

Adria Nassim - CIP Alumna

By Adria Nassim
CIP Alumna & Herald Times Columnist

A few weeks ago, I published a column on college support programs for students with autism spectrum disorders. The fact that the disorder now affects 1 in every 59 children has prompted more postsecondary institutions to recognize the need for programming that supports the unique needs of these students.

Examples of such programs include: Western Kentucky University’s Kelley Autism Program, Drexel University’s Drexel Autism Support Program and Kent State University’s College Success Program for Students with Asperger’s or Autism.

Many students in the program are capable of handling a university’s academic demands, but have difficulties with executive functioning skills such as organization, planning, and initiating tasks that can sometimes make completion of assignments a challenge.

Also, many students with autism can have a very high intelligence level, but have difficulty with or need reminders to complete self care and daily living skills such as laundry and grocery shopping as well as supports with building social skills.

Programs such as those listed above tend to offer extra supports in these areas where a traditional college or university may not.

Read the Article

About College Internship Program

The College Internship Program is a comprehensive transition program for young adults on the Autism Spectrum and with Learning Differences. Our Mission is to inspire independence and expand the foundation on which young adults with Autism, ADHD, and other Learning Differences can build happy and productive lives.